THe Blog

June 16, 2016

Reclassification of Urban

Yoginder K. Alagh, in this Indian Express article, argues that "recognition [by] senior policymakers in the government that many so-called large villages are really urban areas but are not classified as towns on account of various reasons is a step in the right direction. Demographers from the 1990s onwards have questioned the definition of rural and urban and underlined the fact that reclassification of large villages to towns leads to substantial advances in our understanding of the dynamics of movements in the Indian economy. This phenomenon was not recognised as urbanisation until the 2011 Census...

 

...In all, we are talking about a million or more farmers having moved to census towns. Policymakers have been forced to recognise this phenomenon for 2011, but are still resisting its implications for future planning, which is a terrible mistake...

 

The 2011 Census shows that this trend was prevalent in the whole country and the increase in the population of census towns was roughly equivalent to the increase in the rate of urbanisation of the country. The census authority was saying that more than 4 crore Indians had moved from villages to urban areas, which were not officially classified as municipalities, notified towns or cantonments and, were not counted as urban. In the 11th plan (2007-2012), this problem was finally recognised. The base numbers were changed, but corrections were not factored in the projections of urban population...

 

The 2011 Census shows that this trend was prevalent in the whole country and the increase in the population of census towns was roughly equivalent to the increase in the rate of urbanisation of the country. The census authority was saying that more than 4 crore Indians had moved from villages to urban areas, which were not officially classified as municipalities, notified towns or cantonments and, were not counted as urban. In the 11th plan (2007-2012), this problem was finally recognised. The base numbers were changed, but corrections were not factored in the projections of urban population... But these were not officially taken into account and, therefore, the provision to build infrastructure in market towns — markets, storage facilities, processing of agriculture commodities, roads, communication infrastructure — was not provided to the extent needed..."

 

Read the full article here

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